The Journey

Summer of Adventure: The Journey

We’ve created a list of stellar activities that will help you to READ, MAKE, and EXPLORE while at home! These activities will change every Monday so be sure to come back for more fun.

  • Maker Challenge entry HOME

    Birth to 5

    Create a sorting game! Gather common household items such as keys, lids, refrigerator magnets, spoons, and cottonballs. You will want several of each item. Place them all together in a bin, then have your toddler sort them out according to type! You may want to provide several plastic bowls for the sorting.

    K-5th

    Reorganize your room for the summer! Start from the bottom up. Sit down on your floor and make groups of all the things that currently do not have a home: a stack of books, a pile of LEGOs, a mountain of stuffed animals, and a tower of art supplies, for example. Next, ask your grown up for help finding bins around the house that you can repurpose as cubbies. These might be discarded shipping boxes, plastic crates, and shoeboxes. Spend some time decorating your new cubbies with wrapping paper, colored paper, paint, and stickers. Label each one according to what you will store in it, and then stick to your new organization system all summer long!

    6th-12th

    School is officially out for the summer! Take this opportunity go through and reorganize your desk, or the space where you usually do homework. Use keepsake cups and mugs to store pens, find old plastic containers that are missing lids to use as drawer dividers, and gather all your schoolwork together in folders or binders. Consider using the space under your desk for extra storage by adding a crate or bin. Think about hanging a bulletin board above your desk to display pictures and mementos. (You can actually make your own bulletin board by covering foam board with fabric!)

    Grownups

    With everyone out of school for the summer, it can be tricky to keep your home in order! Play a game with your family each night to make this task a fun one. Write numbers one through ten on separate sheets of paper, fold each one, and put them together in a container or jar. Each night before bedtime, pull out a paper and read the number. Then, each family member has to pick up and put away that many things before heading to bed. For example, if you draw the number 8, each person will find 8 items around the house to pick up and put away.

  • Maker Challenge entry OUTDOORS

    Birth to 5

    Pick a dandelion bouquet. Dandelions grow so quickly, they are a great plant to use to discuss buds, blooms, and dying off. Help your little one identify dandelions in all three stages of growth, and pick a handful to bring indoors for a mini bouquet.

    K-5th

    Time to level up your sidewalk chalk game! Find masking tape, duct tape, or painters tape, and a set of sidewalk chalk. Use the tape to create shapes on one square of your sidewalk, sort of like a mosaic or a stained glass window. Color in each section with a single color of chalk. (Pro tip: slightly damp chalk with be brighter and last longer!) Carefully remove the tape once all your sections are colored in. Now you have an abstract masterpiece!

    6th-12th

    Find a planting pot, empty tin can, or space in your yard. Plant a few easy to grow seeds, such as basil, marigolds, or sunflowers. (Sunflowers will want a lot of room to grow!) Make a plan to take a picture of your seeds each day, even before they sprout. At the end of the summer, once your seeds have grown and bloomed, create a fast-paced slideshow or stop motion film using your daily photographs!

    Grownups

    Go on a family outdoor scavenger hunt! Use this card as a guide to get started. You can make the hunt as simple or complex as you would like! For example, you could look for any bird (with younger kids) or a chickadee specifically (with older kids)!

  • Maker Challenge entry MOVEMENT

    Birth to 5

    Activities that encourage your child to move their legs or arms across their body is called "crossing the midline." Crossing the midline helps connect the two sides of the brain. Practice by helping your child use their right hand to touch their left foot, then their left hand to touch their right foot. This is harder than it sounds! Be sure to repeat often to build this skill.

    K-5th

    When we think of movement activities, we usually think of gross motor activities. (Gross motor skills are the ones you use for big movements like running or bicycling.) But fine motor activities are important, too! (Fine motor skills are the ones you use for tasks like writing and typing.) Sharpen your fine motor skills by using your nondominent hand (the one you don't write with) to do fine motor tasks you would usually use your dominent hand to do. Try eating dinner tonight using your nondominent hand instead of your dominent hand. Challenge your family to do the same!

    6th-12th

    Time to swing! Yes, we know you did lots of swinging when you were younger, but did you know that swinging has some pretty great health benefits? In addition to strengthening your leg and core muscles, the back and forth aspect of swinging can be very therapeutic and destressing.

    Grownups

    Create secret handshakes with your kids. Make them as elaborate as possible, with twists, turns, jumps, claps, and snaps. Practice until you have each child's secret handshake memorized, then make a game of remembering each day this week. Whoever messes up the handshake has to take a penalty, such as having to wear a fake mustache on your next family walk.

  • Maker Challenge entry VIRTUAL

    Birth to 5

    Tough topics are tough! Sometimes circumstances arise that are completely unexpected. Luckily, Sesame Street is here to help! Play this game to help Rosita navigate difficult situations, building strategies in case these scenarios arise in your own lives.

    K-5th

    Conduct a virtual interview with an older family member, such as a grandparent. Plan a list of ten to twelve questions in advance and allow for your call to last twenty to thirty minutes. Some questions you might want to ask are, "Did you have a favorite stuffed animal when you were my age?" "What sounds do you enjoy?" "Which animal do you think would make a great racecar driver?" "What makes a day great, in your opinion?" "If you had to rename everyone in my family, what would their names be?"

    6th-12th

    It sometimes seems like grown-ups have unending questions for younger folks. Next time you have the opportunity, turn the tables! Compose an email to a grown-up you know well, such as one of your parents. Fill the email with five or six unusual and unexpected questions for them. (Keep the total number of questions small so that the recepient can answer with lots of details!) Some questions you might like to ask are, "What's a memory that makes you happy?" "If you wrote a book, what would it be about?" "What do you think is the most important thing a teacher can teach a student?"

    Grownups

    With the long summer days ahead, now is a great time to make a plan for healthy screen time. Get started on a Family Media plan here.